I Was Wrong

If you are the kind or person who is constantly blazing a new trail throughout your life’s journey, you’re likely to experience missteps when burrowing through uncharted territory; and this is a good thing.

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Onlookers, casual spectators, doubters, critics and haters are watching every step you make and are likely to point out that you’re wrong to wander off the beaten path. It’s as if in the event that you suffer any damages that you deserve it because you’re not doing it right or as though something is wrong with you. The nay sayers may try to demean you, disrespect, try to discredit you or make fun of you. Their expectation is that you turn away from your cavalier exploration and return to the herd in an effort to save yourself from embarrassment, death or worse…

The truth of the matter is the haters and hecklers are not bad people, it’s just that they are incredibly frightened you might succeed and any mistake that you might make along the way, justifies their lack of taking a more proactive approach to their life. The more they exploit your mistakes, the better they feel about their own mediocrity, for at the very least, they are somewhat safe and no one is challenging their decision to remain in the life they’ve become comfortably accustomed to.

I applaud you for being one of the few of us who choose to take the road less traveled. It’s not so much that we develop a skin thick enough not to react to attacks by folks who are uncomfortable with our personal growth and progress it’s just that we wouldn’t let someone’s words throw us off track. At least they’re not using sticks and stones.

The best way to quickly recover and get back is to acknowledge you could have done better and get back to your work. If your accusers appear to have an attitude of genuine concern or reside within your inner circle of influence a little humility goes a long way. Humbly admitting

I Screwed Up

Will help people feel more empathetic to your cause if you are simply expressing your flawed humanity. No one can begrudge you for seeing us all as basically the same, all doing the best we can with what we have, even if some of us do it differently than others. On the other hand, if they are just hateful or disrespectful, you do not have to acknowledge their accusations at all.

Listen to Feedback

Occasionally, unsuspecting spectators can offer input or observations you were unable to see while entangled in the work that lead to your misstep. So, it’s good to lend an ear to those who have been watching from afar in case they may have insight that may prove to be helpful once you regain your balance and continue to re-engage your process. And you may be surprised to find helpful insight coming from hateful attackers (though it is unnecessary to acknowledge them, if it is your policy not to respond to people who are unkind), just file away the learning. In fact, for folks like us, there is no failure, only learning.

Learning from Mistakes

The most important component is that you extract all the knowledge obtained via your process of trial and error. The results give you a unique perspective which cannot be duplicated by the armchair observers as you move forward while taking responsibility for your actions.

You can spend years in college learning about all the best characteristics and techniques filling your head with practical concepts and knowledge, but the men and women on the front lines with their feet on the street actually doing the work and creatively approaching challenges as they appear on-the-fly and dealing with real-life circumstances which won’t show up in textbooks for years, they are the real heroes.

These are the innovators, not the imitators. They are setting themselves apart from the masses. To them it is better to create something from scratch, to bring value to the community for the greater good, even to aspire to make the world a better place, not just for themselves, but for the world at large for generations to come.

I am not condemning those who have opted to follow the path of academia. I applaud them for their efforts and discipline and find they make important team members. They bring skills and perspectives to the table that expands far beyond entrepreneurial street smarts, and they may well be innovators as well (and if they hang out with me for long, will find themselves spending more and more time looking outside the box, too).

Thanks for taking the high road.
We’re all on this journey together, yet independently.

-Carpe DM

 

With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

You have a unique superpower, a gift or ability of value and importance to benefit the community or the world. It is an innate ability, gift or talent you were born with – so from your own perspective – it may not seem as though it is any ability at all, because it is simply part of the person you are and you accept it as a personality trait or flaw. That is, if you recognize it at all, due to suppression of your special powers early on, in your youth.

For those of us in the ministry of empowering people and helping them to recognize and embrace their unique abilities, it is not that dissimilar to the work of Xavier (Professor X) founder of the X-Men, as he seeks out mutants who possess unnatural abilities. For those who possess the abilities, in most cases they are perceived as a disability, they believe they are unworthy or are too timid and/or shy to be of any value to others. With Xavier’s coaching they discover what they had thought was a personal curse, was actually a super-power, if embraced and mastered. The comic book premise is not far from the truth.

Whether you thank Voltaire or Spider-man’s Uncle Ben for the phrase

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With great power comes great responsibility

the fact remains that those who possess a particular superpower and wield it with power and authority, have an obligation to use their abilities for good and not evil. At the very least acknowledging and accepting the Hippocratic Oath’s tenet, “to do no harm,” is an honorable forbearance. Enough to give one pause before deploying your power in a way that may have a negative effect later or on someone else. Though, this cannot always be guaranteed that no one will ever be harmed, for that is a matter of perspective, but at least to be vigilantly respectful and cognoscente prior to executing your ability would be virtuous.

This caveat (and/or cause for pause) should preempt any use of power or force, from parenting to social interactions and from education to law enforcement, especially in acts of violence and war.

Sometimes, a well-pondered playing out of possible outcomes using your power of imagination, can help you come to a logical conclusion as to whether this is the right time, place and circumstance to use your special power in full force. You might conclude using only a small sample of your ability sufficient in the moment, or not using it may be your best contribution for the greater good.

The idea of considering what is in the best interest of the greater good is of paramount importance when exercising one’s innate powers and abilities. It’s as if you as the fully empowered superhero must act from a place of humility and possess a servant’s heart for maximum effectiveness and maintenance of potential damage control, always weighing the effects of your actions on others and the world at large.

It’s easy to understand why superheroes have the need to use an alter ego or alternative personality to blend in while navigating the world of everyday life, then don a costume when exercising their abilities in full force.

In fact, many of us tend to suit-up so-to-speak to exercise our superpowers in public, though many of us can conduct our contributions for the most part in private or secrecy.

Do you exercise your superpowers responsibly?