When the Going Gets Tough

The Tough Get Going

What does, “When the going gets tough the tough get going,” mean?


Does it mean that when things become difficult that were supposed to push through and do whatever is necessary to stay on this single, focused track?

Or, does it mean

To grab your stuff and find another direction to go in?

If you ask me, the answer is both.

It comes down to a matter of what you really, really want.

When things get tough, at the very least, it’s an attention-grabber enabling you to pull back and reassess your situation. This applies to any time the going gets rough.

As a conscious traveler, this is your opportunity to take time to re-evaluate, so stop, take a break and look around. What do you see? What do you feel?

How does your current circumstance fit within your idea of the path leading to your highest and best?

Consider this: If you are inspired, moving on the right path, in the right direction and gaining momentum from where you were to where you want to be, then the journey should basically be resistant-free.

Resistance (or when the going gets tough) is an indication of the need to change.

Now, you can push-through and make yourself and everyone else in your car stay on the track you’re so determined to maintain (which is not a bad thing) or you can be looking for alternative opportunities.

In most cases, when you are faced with a great deal of resistance, there is a divine door waiting for you to explore, leading to a path that is a more effective route to the destination you to arrive at.

You can stay on the path you are currently on, or you can consider taking the doorway to another path that could be far better for you.

This is not to say that if you are on the right track, that you will never encounter difficulty, but consider this: If things are difficult, it is likely an indicator that you could be doing something different, something better.

And it doesn’t necessarily mean a drastic change, it could be only the slightest adjustment that could make all the difference.

For instance, if you’re in Seattle and you’re flying across the country in a straight line, you would end up in New York, by changing your flight path by just a few degrees (not much at all, really) you would end up in Miami.

Sure, you could still get to Miami (assuming that is where you wanted to be) by going to New York first, then travelling from New York to Miami, but when the going gets tough, it could be an indication there is a better way.

So, when the going gets tough, realize that you are making your travel plans and paying for them. Wouldn’t it be prudent to take the time to review all your options before you commit to your travel arrangements?

Plus (I don’t know if you noticed that most bookings are non-refundable these days). I recently booked a flight for two and my traveling companion couldn’t make the trip. So I thought, “great, I’ll have extra leg room and twice as much overhead space.”

To my surprise, I discovered that the airline sells that seat, so even though I paid for it, they resold it again. (Although, I could have paid a fee in excess of what I paid for the ticket to receive a refund.) What?