How to Do What You Want

How to do what you want, if you really want to.

Sometimes you want to do something so bad but it just seems too impossible, distant or out of reach. You can feel like you’re unworthy, not educated or qualified enough, or feel like someone else would be better or more respected for doing that thing that you want to do.

Focusing only on the ultimate goal, the end game, can be just too intimidating because it seems so far off or impossible from where you’re standing right now.

You have the power to take complete control over making your dream come true, or not.

What’s the answer to how to do what you want, if you really want to?

Keep the idea of your ultimate goal out there but take your focus and refocus it on taking small steps that lead you closer to your goal. You don’t have to do it all in one fail swoop. Just move a little closer to it each day or each week.

So, what do you want?

Want to live a stress-free life?

Do something relaxing every day, meditate, take a walk in the park, take a bubble bath with scented candles.

Want to start a new, or build a better, business?

Schedule time to research strategies and ideas – being certain to include taking action (not just research) – every week.

Want to write?

Then write. 500 words a day doth a writer make.

Prioritize

You can prioritize whatever you want and if you are moving toward it on a regular basis, sure enough, you’ll get there.

To prioritize and move closer to what you want (what you really, really want), all you have to do is what everyone else does (I know, they make it look so simple. Right? Well, it is).

Do the Doing of It

Make a plan, and do it. The difference between those who take and those who don’t is all in the doing of it.

Let’s say you wanted to publish a novel (you can use these steps to achieve any goal)

1. Write down what you want

Publish a novel

2. Break down your steps in miniature, each one moving you closer

Create a main storyline plot

Create character profiles for key players and their roles
Create an outline of major events (or chapters)

Write the first chapter as a rough draft

Write the second chapter (rough draft)

Followed by subsequent chapters…

Revise each chapter, flushing out the characters, dialogues, and interplay… (one chapter at a time)

Edit each chapter in succession, one-at-a-time.

3. Determine how much time you will have to allocate for moving toward what you want (daily, weekly, monthly)

I will set aside one hour each day to write my novel, a little each day.

4. Make dates with what you want, set times and dates to keep with yourself for the doing

8:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. weeknights

9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. on weekends

There you have it.

Make time every day for the doing, and every day you’re closer than you were the day before. Before you know it, your first novel is ready to submit.

Then you can,

Celebrate!

Those Who Take Action and Those Who Don’t

There are two kinds of people, those who take action and those who don’t. All of the people on this planet are born with a dream, a dream to believe, achieve, be or do something unique and meaningful, but few, very few, do what is necessary to realize their dream; that is to take action.

How can you tell the difference between those who take action and those who don’t take action?

Those who don’t take action are all around you. Wherever you see large groups of people, most of them are just like the majority of the rest of us. They are passive in their pursuit of life. At best, how they spend their time and efforts are basically focused on being a supportive part of the machine, which is integral to the continuation of the machine.

They engage in all the activity the powers behind the machine have given them to distract them from the dream they once had and keep their minds so busy, I mean frantically busy, so they couldn’t have the attention or time to focus on their dream if they had one.

Then there are those who vaguely remember their dream, and think about taking action. These people might even start to research about their dream and taking action to start creating their dream in an attempt to raise their awareness about their dream. They spend the spare moments they are able to glean from the crowded highway of life to research, to increase their knowledge, until they feel confident enough, that they know enough, to take action. But there’s so much to learn. So much information, in fact, that you will never feel like you are informed enough or prepared enough to take action. You’ve spend so much time on preparation and learning that there is no time left for taking action.

Then there are those who boldly take action. You may not know them, personally, but you know who they are. We spend our time and money on them and we focus our attention on them. We watch and support the people who have taken the action to live their dream. We watch them living their dreams in the movies, on TV, on the stage, or on the field. We buy their tickets, play their games, and wear their clothes. We admire the way they think, display their skills, and share their lives with us. We listen to their music, their words, and pay attention to the action they take. We see them, we watch them, we love them and we hate them for what they do.

And what is it that they are doing?
They are living their dream.

Sometimes, we wish we could live a dream, like they have, but feel that we’re just not good enough, or lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time for good fortune to shower down on us, like it did those people. But the truth is,

There are two kinds of people, those who take action and those who don’t.

The people whose work we admire had a dream and took action. In fact, they took massive action.

They didn’t have the time; they didn’t have any more time than you or me. They made the time… Every day.

They’re no better than you, anyone you know, have ever met, or anyone else on this planet. They’re just like you and me.

You might be sitting next to one of them right now. It’s easy to tell the difference between someone who has taken the action to achieve their highest and best and someone who hasn’t. Want to know how?

Ask them what they did today.
Today.

You can tell if a dreamer is tracking their dream and taking the action to make it come true by what they did today to move closer to their dream.

Oh, they might talk the talk; talk is cheap. Did they take action, today?

If they did not, they are still a dreamer, and that’s a good thing. Sometimes our dreams are all that we have, and even if we don’t live our dreams, maybe our dreams can inspire someone else to break free from the mob and take action.

It’s so simple. The people, who achieve their dreams, take action to move them closer to their desired outcome every day. Every day.

Just the fact that you have a dream alive inside you means that dream has already come to pass in the future. It’s already there, already a done deal. Your dream is just waiting for you to arrive. And right now, it’s wondering where the hell you are.

Do you have a dream? Are you ready to take the necessary action to achieve your dream, to make it come true once and for all? Are you ready to live your life on the other side of the screen? Not always watching, but becoming the person you were meant to be? To do the things you were called to do?

Then do it.

Yes, study, raise your awareness, courage, and prepare. But don’t get stuck there.

Take action.

Take action every day.

Be the best you can be.

Live a better life, your best life and make the world a better place.

Power of Complaining

Ever know someone who appears to be constantly complaining about everything, the state of the world, being surrounded by evil or stupid people, and of course their constantly being victimized?

A pessimistic chronic complainer, like that, might be off-putting, especially to the optimist. The optimist might see the individual fueled by constant whining and complaining as an ever present drain on their own personal energy reserves. It can be frustrating maintaining an effective level of communication between individuals on opposite ends of the spectrum.

power of complaining pessimistic whining complaint take action

When team-building, I always like to have a chronic complainer on-board, someone who sees problems everywhere they look, even in the best of circumstances, they will offer up a “what if” that could lead to an outcome of apocalyptic proportions. Some might consider this pessimistic influence a non-constructive waste of time, but I think to assume there is little value in looking at anything from a different perspective as folly.

Those who fail to see the value of the complainer may also fail to see the value in the complaint. For is it not true that

Every technological and sociological advancement is the result of complaining

Of course it is not simply enough to complain, for complaining – and continuing to complain – about something exemplifies powerlessness, but to complain, then as quickly as possible find ways to counteract the issue at hand with a definitive action, this person has evolved as the pessimist activist.

The pessimist activist complains about the state of a thing or circumstance and goes about taking action fueled by their angst in the hopes of having some impact on the situation.

Unlike the optimist who focuses on the happy, joyful outcome of a particular situation or circumstance from an, “if only” perspective, the pessimist approaches the same conundrum from the, “what if,” perspective and the pessimist activist takes action based on their desire to prevent a worst case scenario.

And both of them are right

There is not one that is more right than the other, it is what it is, and the teaming of these individuals in a yin/yang approach to tackling any obstacle, problem-solving or visionary project is priceless.

As for the complainer who refuses to take action, they tend to find themselves depleting their own energy reserves and often find themselves battling depression and persistent health concerns. But it doesn’t take much to counteract the effects of complaining by (as quickly as possible) integrating some level of activity to augment the otherwise negative outlook.

For instance, if one asserts, “There is no happiness in my life,” taking the action of creating a little happiness based on the complaint and – voila – you’re on your way to empowering your power of complaining. An example might be to go to a comedy show, call or visit a young relative who looks up to you, take your dog for a walk, buy a new outfit (or shoes), take a hike or walk on the beach… or whatever makes you feel happy. To not do so, only creates a sense of helplessness.

If you’re particularly focused on some other person’s lack of intelligence or propensity for causing dangerous circumstances, taking action on your complaint is better than not doing anything. You could offer a productivity tool as a gift, file a formal complaint or study to teach a class or write a report/book that might be helpful for others dealing with similar people.

If you feel an urge to constantly complain about the state of the world, then exchange your, “what if,” which normally leads to a worst case conclusion, to “what if I could do something about it?” And the something you could do need not be of worldwide significance to have an impact. You could simply post your observation(s) on social media, call into a talk radio program or write a letter to the editor. Your action (though minute in comparison to your concern) may be helpful in making others aware of the potential disaster and may help the idea reach critical mass, which always has – and always will – lead to change.

I extend my sincere gratitude for all the empowered complainers who help to make the world a better place.

Keep complaining

(and do something about it)